Recipes

Written by Natural Health Centre
Fermented Foods – “The Doorway to Natural Health”

Note:  All the following recipes have been adapted to use 1 opened capsule of a high quality probiotic mixed into the liquid.  It is healthier than using whey or extra salt instead of the whey.

Enjoy and experiment with the following recipes.  They are truly easy to do.  Eat 2 Tablespoons of fermented food with lunch and dinner or more for your dinner meal.  Helps to bring about health in the intestines and therefore your whole body and it is tasty too.  Refer to your Genetic Type and combine fruits and or veges from your specific type for even better health.

  • Cortido

    A Latin American Sauerkraut from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon

    • 1 large cabbage, cored and shredded
    • 1 cup carrots, grated
    • 2 medium onions, quartered lengthwise and very finely sliced
    • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
    • 1/4 – 1/2 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    • 1 tablespoon sea salt
    • 1 opened capsule of a good probiotic opened into the liquid.  Mix well.
    1. In a large bowl mix cabbage with carrots, onions, oregano, red pepper flakes, sea salt and 1 opened capsule of probiotics.
    2. Pound with a wooden pounder or a meat hammer for about 10 minutes to release juices.
    3. Place in 2 quart-sized, wide mouth mason jars and press down firmly with a pounder or meat hammer until juices come to the top of the cabbage. The top of the cabbage mixture should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jars.
    4. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.
  • Cultured Salsa

    adapted from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon

    • 4 medium tomatoes, about 2 pounds total
    • 2 small onions, finely chopped
    • 1-2 bell peppers, seeded
    • 1 jalapeno pepper, seeded (or not if you prefer more spice)
    • 1 bunch cilantro
    • juice of 2 lemons
    • 1 tablespoon sea salt
    • 1 opened capsule of a good probiotic mixed in well with the liquid.
    • 1/4 cup filtered water
    1. If you prefer peeled tomatoes: score the bottoms, drop into boiling water for about 15 seconds, remove and place in ice water. The peels should come off easily.
    2. Chop all ingredients by hand or with a food processor to desired consistency. Mix and place in a very clean quart-sized, wide mouth mason jar. Press down with a wooden spoon, adding more water to cover the vegetables. Be sure to leave 1-2″ head space.
    3. Cover tightly and keep at room temperature for 2-3 days before transferring to cold storage.
  • Garlic-Dill Cucumber Pickles

    adapted from Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon

    • 4-5 pickling cucumbers or 15-20 gherkins
    • 2 garlic cloves, peeled and crushed
    • 2 tablespoons fresh dill, snipped
    • 1/8 teaspoon red pepper flakes
    • 1 tablespoon sea salt
    • 1 opened capsule of a good probiotic mixed in well with the liquid.
    • 1-2 clean grape or oak leaves
    • 1 cup filtered water
    1. Wash cucumbers well and place in a quart-sized wide mouth jar.
    2. Combine remaining ingredients and pour over cucumbers, adding more water if necessary to cover the cucumbers. The top of the liquid should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar.
    3. Cover tightly and keep and keep at room temperature for about 3 days before transferring to cold storage.
  • Victoria’s Recipes:

    Victoria has perfected these over the years, taking some from the Sally Fallon’s & Weston A. Price Foundation’s cookbook, and created some of her own.  Be creative with your own versions of fermented foods – experiment.

    Traditional Sauerkraut

    Makes 1 Quart

    • 1 medium cabbage, cored and shredded
    • 1 T caraway seeds
    • 1 T sea salt
    • Optional: 1 capsule of probiotics emptied into the liquid.
    1. In a bowl, mix cabbage, caraway seeds, sea salt and probiotics.  Pound this with a wooden pounder or meat hammer for about 10 minutes to release the juices.
    2.  Place in quart size jar, wide mouth Mason jar, and press down firmly with the pounder until the juices cover the top of the cabbage. The juice needs to cover the cabbage by at least 1 inch.
    3.  Just place the lid on the top – do not screw down yet until ready to store.
    4. Keep at room temperature for 3 to 7 days or longer according to your taste.
    5.  Then transfer it to your refrigerator for storage.  Cap with lid, label and date jar.  Sauerkraut con be eaten immediately, but improves with age.

    You can add many vegetables to this basic recipe – experiment.

  • Dairy Keifer

    You can buy keifer powder from a good health food store or use keifer grains.  Simply mix the milk with keifer grains and let stand at room temperature for 24 hours.  The mixture should be thick and a more lovely sour taste.  Strain off the keifer grains and mix these into more milk to feed.  They can be refrigerated to slow the growth.  If using the powder, I have heard that you can use one of your finished products by saving ¼ C and mixing that into the next batch.  Keifer grains may be ordered off the internet or shared from your friends.  They keep growing and multiplying.

    Ginger Carrots

    Makes 1 Quart

    • 4 cups grated carrots, tightly packed
    • 1 T freshly grated ginger
    • 1 T sea salt

    Optional: 1 capsule of probiotics emptied into the liquid.

    These are the best introduction to lacto-fermented vegetables we know: the taste is delicious and the sweetness of the carrots neutralizes the acidity that some people find disagreeable when they are first introduced to lacto-fermented vegetables.  Ginger carrots go well with rich foods and spicy meats.

    1. In a bowl, mix all ingredients and pound with a wooden pounder or meat hammer to release juices.
    2.  Place in a quart-sized jar, wide-mouth Mason jar and press down firmly until the juices cover the carrots.  The top of the carrots should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar.
    3. Cover lightly and leave at room temperature about 3 to 7 days before transferring to cold storage.
    4. Cap with lid, label and date jar.
  • Apple & Pear Chutney

    Makes 1 Quart

    • 3 C fresh apples and pears (any fruit can be used)
    • ½ C filtered water
    • Grated rind of 2 lemons
    • Juice of 2 lemons
    • 2 t sea salt
    • ½ C preferably soaked pecans or other nuts, lightly chopped
    • ½ C raisins, cherries or other dried fruit
    • 1 t ground cumin
    • ½ t red pepper flakes
    • ½ t dried green peppercorns, crushed
    • ½ t dried thyme
    • 1 t fennel seeds
    • 1 t coriander seeds

    Optional: 1 capsule of probiotics emptied into liquid.

    1. Mix water, lemon juice, lemon rind, salt and contents of probiotic capsule.
    2.  Peel fruit and cut up into lemon juice mixture.
    3.  Mix with nuts, dried fruit, herbs and spices and place in a 1 quart, wide mouth Mason jar.
    4. Press down lightly with a wooden pounder, addition more water if necessary to cover the fruit.  The mixture should be at least 1 inch below the top of the jar.
    5. Cover lightly and keep at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to the refrigerator.  This should b eaten within 2 months.  Best within a few weeks.  Cap with lid, label and date jar.
  • Rice Milk & Variations

    Makes 2 Quarts

    • ½ C Brown rice
    • 8 Cups filtered water
    • 1 t sea salt
    • ¼ Cup honey (should be wild, raw, – non heated honey)
    • 1 t cinnamon

    Optional: 1 capsule of probiotics emptied into liquid.

    This recipe comes from Eqypt, but similar recipes can be found through the Middle and Far East.  Fermented grain drinks were traditionally prescribed to nursing mothers.

    1. Cook rice in water, covered, for several hours until rice becomes very mushy.  Pass rice and liquid through a food mill (or blender, our note, not Sally’s) until smooth.
    2. Place in a 2 quart jar with salt and probiotics mixed in.
    3. Cover lightly and leave at room temperature for 2 – 3 days.  Transfer to refrigerator.  (A certain amount of separation is normal.)
    4. Cap with lid, label and date jar.

    To serve, blend with honey and cinnamon and enough water to achieve desired consistency.

    Variation: use other grains, such as oats, rye or barley.

    Variation:  Nursing Mothers Tonic

    Use ½ C quinoa, soaked for 12 hours in warm water, rinsed and drained. Then proceed as above starting with cooking the quinoa in 8 cups of water.

  • Fruit Kimchi

    • 1 large heard napa cabbage
    • 2 medium onions
    • 6 cloves of garlic
    • 2 red hot chilies
    • 4 inch piece of ginger-root
    • 2 C blackberries
    • 6 small plums
    • 1 capsule of probiotics emptied into the liquid.

    Feel free to experiment with different fruits or vegetables that are in season.  The basics for kimchi are onion, garlic, ginger and red hot chili and you can experiment from there.

    1. Mix a brine of about 4 cups of water and 4 T salt.  Stir well to thoroughly dissolve salt.  The brine should taste good and salty.
    2. Coarsely chop the cabbage, slice the vegetables, then soak in the brine for a few hours.
    3. Prepare the spices: Grate or chop the ginger, chop the garlic and onion, remove seeds from the chilies and chop or crush or throw them in whole.
    4. Drain brine off veggies and save.  Taste veggies for saltiness.  They should taste salty, but not to the point that they taste bad.
    5. Mix everything together and put into a jar.  Pack it down tightly until the bring rises to cover the veggies.  Add more brine if necessary to submerge the vegetables.
    6. Ferment in a warm place for about 1 week.  Taste everyday.  Move it to the refrigerator with it tastes right.
    7. Because of the natural sugar, fruit kimchi needs to be consumed within about 1 month to 6 weeks.  After this time the sugar begins to turn to alcohol.
    8. Cap with lid, label and date jar.
  • Coconut Keifer Milk

    Take your keifer grains and rinse them carefully in a strainer.  Even leave them in water for a few hours to be very clean.  Then using coconut milk or coconut water follow the above recipe.
  • Pink Kimchi

    Makes 2 Quarts

    Here is a recipe for a beautiful pink kimchi.  IT is flavorful, but vey mild.  You can add hot peppers if you prefer it spicy?

    • 1 medium head green cabbage
    • 2 turnips (scarlet variety if available or substitute red radishes)
    • ½ C grated daikon radish
    • 1 C grated beet root
    • 1 T grated fresh ginger
    • 2 cloves garlic
    • 1 T unrefined salt
    • 1 capsule of probiotics emptied into liquid.
    1. Coarsely chop cabbage, grate turnips, daikon radish, beet and ginger.
    2.  Mix all ingredients in a large mixing bowl.  Let sit for a few minutes to allow the salt to soften the vegetables.
    3.  Pound with Kraut pounder until vegetable have release their juices.
    4. Pack into quart jars and press down with kraut pounder until vegetables are below level of juices.  Leave at least 1 inch headroom.
    5. Let sit at room temperature for 2 – 3 days.  In cooler weather fermentation may take longer.  Taste kimchi after 2 – 3 days and ferment longer if needed.
    6. Store kimchi in the refrigerator or cool location.  It will last for several months and improves with age.  Serve with anything you like.  It goes well served as a side with a cooked meat dish.
  • Kimchik

    Makes about 2 Quarts

    • 1 large Napa Cabbage
    • 1 small head of garlic, peeled and finely minced
    • 1 2 inch piece of fresh ginger, peeled and minced
    • 4 T chili powder (depending on how hot you like it)1 bunch green onions, cut into a 1 inch lengths (use dark green part too)
    • 1 medium daikon radish, peeled and grated
    • 2 – 4 hot chilies of mixed colors (depending on how hot you like it)
    • 1 T salt
    • 1 probiotic cap emptied into liquid.
    1. Chop and mix the ingredients in a very large bowl.
    2.  Crush gently with a kraut-pounder to release the juices.  With this much chili, rubber gloves can be a good idea if you are sensitive.
    3. Then pack the kimchi in a clean glass jar large enough to hold it all.  Using a plastic lid or plate, submerge the mixture so it is covered by juices.
    4.  Let stand for 3 – 4 days around room temperature.
    5. Check the kimchi after 3 – 4 days.  Give it a taste and if you like it, then it is ready.  If not, let it ferment a bit longer.
    6.  Move it to the refrigerator to blend and mellow the flavors.  Time will improve the flavor and will keep for a long time.
    7. Cap with lid, label and date jar.

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